5 Little Known But Awesome Places in Concrete

Concrete is a small town but it has many tourist attractions. While some popular places like Sauk Mountain trail, Lake Tyee are well known yet there are many not-so-famous but great attractions yet to be explored by majority of visitors. In this post we will highlight 5 little known but awesome places in Concrete, Washington.

Henry Thompson Bridge

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The old bridge is located across state route 20. You may be surprised to know that the bridge is built in 1916-18 and still enjoys being the world’s longest single-span cement bridge. Back in old days the bride used to be the only access route across the Baker River  into the Skagit County. If you are planning trip, you should not miss the opportunity to enjoy a stroll over it.

Mountain Loop Highway

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This is a very scenic byway that loops through the Mt. Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest providing connection to Boulder River, Around the highway are located Henry M. Jackson and Concrete Peak Wilderness areas, and also hundreds of miles of hiking trails. The length of highway is 27 miles and take around 40 minutes to cross.

Rasar State Park

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Rasar State Park is a 169 acre park. The park  has playground equipment and 4,000 feet of freshwater shoreline on the Skagit River. This spot is well known among visitors  for Eagle watching. Best season to visit the place is early fall and early winter.Mt.

Mount Baker Presbyterian Church

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This historic church is built in 1908 and still mass being held regularly for residents for Skagit county. The main structure has not been remade to keep the old structure intact.

Rockport State Park

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The park is just 8 miles from concrete. The 670 acre park is an ancient forest. The interesting thing about the forest is that it contains old grown which has never been logged. The entire ecosystem of the park in the place as it was before. Also visit David Douglas Historical Market, which is situated within the park. David Douglas, if you don’t know him, was a horticulturalist who discovered the Douglas fir in 1825.

 Concrete is a small paradise itself within the paradise of North Cascades. The beautiful little town has an amazing history and occupy a place of pride in Nation’s geography.

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